Frame


Frame
Frame is generally accepted as being of Scottish origin although this is by no means certain. It is believed to derive from the Olde English pre 7th century word "fram" - a term for a lusty and vigorous man! Today "Frame" is fairly prevalent on the western side of Scotland, and this is logical as this was the former english speaking kingdom of Strathclyde in pre Norman times. There are also several places in England which may have contributed to the development of the surname. These include Framingham in Norfolk, which was recorded in the 1086 Domesday Book as being "the place (ham) of the Fram tribe (ing)." The name is also recorded on the continent, specifically in The Netherlands, but this is probably coincidence and owing to the close trading connections between the protestant nations in the 17th century. Early recording examples include Daniel Frame, burgess of Edinburgh in 1642, William Fram of Calder in 1679 and James Frame of Canongate, Edinburgh in 1683. Church recordings include Christine Frame who married James Cowp at Lanark, on May 2nd 1654, and William Frame, who married Margaret Mercer at the English Episcopal Church, Amsterdam, on March 2nd 1719. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Adam Frame, which was dated 1495, in the Commissariat Records of Lanark, during the reign of King James 1V of Scotland 1488 - 1513. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

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  • Frame — Frame, n. 1. Anything composed of parts fitted and united together; a fabric; a structure; esp., the constructional system, whether of timber or metal, that gives to a building, vessel, etc., its model and strength; the skeleton of a structure.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Frame — ist in der Hauptbedeutung ein vom englischen Wort frame (dt.: Rahmen, Gestell) stammendes Fremdwort, das in verschiedenen Zusammenhängen verwendet wird: als Abstraktum: den sichtbaren Bildausschnitt eines Films Einzelbilder in Filmen, Animationen …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • frame — [frām] vt. framed, framing [ME framen < frame, a structure, frame, prob. < ON frami, profit, benefit, akin to frama, to further < fram, forward (akin to OE fram, FROM); some senses < OE framian, to be helpful: see FURNISH] 1. to shape …   English World dictionary

  • Frame — Frame, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Framed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Framing}.] [OE. framen, fremen, to execute, build, AS. fremman to further, perform, effect, fr. fram strong, valiant; akin to E. foremost, and prob. to AS. fram from, Icel. fremja, frama, to… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • frame — ► NOUN 1) a rigid structure surrounding a picture, door, etc. 2) (frames) a metal or plastic structure holding the lenses of a pair of glasses. 3) the rigid supporting structure of a vehicle, piece of furniture, or other object. 4) a person s… …   English terms dictionary

  • frame — vt framed, fram·ing 1: to formulate the contents of and draw up (as a document) in the two hundred years since our Constitution was framed W. J. Brennan, Jr. 2: to contrive the evidence against (as an innocent person) so that a verdict of guilty… …   Law dictionary

  • frame — frame, framing, frame analysis In Frame Analysis (1974), Erving Goffman defines a ‘frame’ as ‘definitions of the situation [that] are built up in accordance with the principles of organization which govern events at least social ones and our… …   Dictionary of sociology

  • Frame — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Se denomina frame en inglés, a un fotograma o cuadro, una imagen particular dentro de una sucesión de imágenes que componen una animación. La continua sucesión de estos fotogramas producen a la vista la sensación de… …   Wikipedia Español

  • Frame — Frame, v. i. 1. To shape; to arrange, as the organs of speech. [Obs.] Judg. xii. 6. [1913 Webster] 2. To proceed; to go. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] The bauty of this sinful dame Made many princes thither frame. Shak. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • frame-up — frame ups N COUNT A frame up is a situation where someone pretends that an innocent person has committed a crime by deliberately lying or inventing evidence. [INFORMAL] He was innocent and the victim of a frame up …   English dictionary