Haugh


Haugh
This is a dual nationality surname, English or Irish or Anglo-Irish. It is recorded in several spelling forms including Hough, Haugh, Haw, Hawes, and Haws, and when English is a topographical or locational surname. It has (at least) three possible origins. The first is locational from residence at a 'hause', which maybe a neck of land, but was generally a place for gathering animals. The town of Hawes in Yorkshire, has the same meaning, but the surname pre-dates the town. The second possibility is as a patronymic from the medieval given name "Haw". This is itself a diminutive or pet-form of 'Hawkin' or 'Havekin', themselves from the Olde English pre 7th Century 'Hafoc'. The third is from the Gaelic Irish O' hEachard, and is believed to translate as 'the descendant of the pleasant one' or similar, and may be a derivative of the female name 'Cathach' first recorded in the 7th century. Examples of the surname recording include Robert Hawyse of Oxford in 1279, John de la Hawe of Huntingdon in the same year, and Maurice ate Hawe, the rector of Newton, Norfolk in 1362. An interesting recording is that of 'Reginoll Hawes', one of the earliest American colonists, who embarked from London, England, on January 15th 1634, bound for Virginia. Sadly James Haugh left Belfast Lough on the ship 'Roscius of Liverpool', on October 12th 1846, bound for New York. He was escaping from the Potato Famine of 1846 - 1848 which decimated much of the population. Throughout the centuries surnames in every country have continued to "develop", often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • haugh — haugh; haugh·ti·ly; haugh·ti·ness; haugh·ty; …   English syllables

  • Haugh — (h[add]), n. [See {Haw} a hedge.] A low lying meadow by the side of a river. [Prov. Eng. & Scot.] [1913 Webster] On a haugh or level plain, near to a royal borough. Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • haugh´ti|ly — haugh|ty «H tee», adjective, ti|er, ti|est. 1. too proud of oneself and too scornful of others: »A haughty person is often unpopular. 2. showing too great pride of oneself and scorn for others: »a haughty smile, a haughty glance, haughty words …   Useful english dictionary

  • haugh|ty — «H tee», adjective, ti|er, ti|est. 1. too proud of oneself and too scornful of others: »A haughty person is often unpopular. 2. showing too great pride of oneself and scorn for others: »a haughty smile, a haughty glance, haughty words …   Useful english dictionary

  • Haugh —    1) HAUGH, a village, in the parish of Mauchline, district of Kyle, county of Ayr, 1½ mile (S.) from Mauchline; containing 79 inhabitants. It is seated on the north bank of the river Ayr, and has a woollen manufactory, chiefly for carpet yarn,… …   A Topographical dictionary of Scotland

  • haugh — noun Etymology: Middle English (Scots) halch, from Old English healh corner of land; akin to Old English holh hole Date: before 12th century Scottish a low lying meadow by the side of a river …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • haugh — /hahkh, hahf/, n. Scot. a stretch of alluvial land forming part of a river valley; bottom land. [bef. 900; ME halche, hawgh, OE healh corner, nook] * * * …   Universalium

  • haugh — I A Geordie Dictionary Pronounced Hoff or Harf a meadow land eg Derwenthaugh II North Country (Newcastle) Words alow, flat, or marshy portion of land beneath higher ground, by the side of a river, liable to be overflowed …   English dialects glossary

  • Haugh — land beside a river …   Scottish slang

  • haugh — [hɔ:, hα:x] noun Scottish & N. English a piece of flat alluvial land by the side of a river. Origin ME: prob. from OE healh corner, nook …   English new terms dictionary


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