Arsey


Arsey
This ancient and distinguished surname, recorded as D'arcy, Darcy, Dorcey, Dorcy, Dorsey, D'orsay, Orsay, and Orsi, is usually of French locational origins, although Irish names may have a different root. The French forms originate from either the village of Arcy in La Manche, named from the Gallic "ars", meaning the bear, and the suffix "-acum", meaning a settlement, or from Orsai village in Seine et Orne. This is a derivative from the Latin personal name Orcius. The surname was introduced into England in the wake of the Norman Invasion of 1066, when the Norman de Arecai, was granted over thirty manors in Lincolnshire by William, the Conqueror. Early examples of the surname recordings include William Daresci; Roger Arsi; and Thomas Darcy all of Lincolnshire, in the years 1166, 1173 and 1273, respectively. In Ireland, D'Arcy is of dual derivation, being either Norman as above, and a follower of Strongbow, earl of Pembroke, who invaded Ireland in 1169, or an Anglicized form of the native Old Gaelic "O'Dorchaidhe", meaning a descendant of the dark one. Early examples of the name recordings include Michee Duuercy, a witness at the French Huguenot church, Threadneedle Street, London, in 1635, and Richard Dorsey, a witness at St Martins in the Field, Westminster, on September 27th 1703. Notable name-bearers include Robert D'Arcy (1718 - 1778), the earl of Holderness, Yorkshire, and Patrick, Count D'Arcy (1725 - 1778), Marshal of France. The first recorded spelling of the family name is believed to be that of Norman de Areci, which was dated 1086, in the Domesday Book for Lincolnshire, during the reign of King William 1st of England, known as "William the Conqueror", 1066- 1087.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • arsey — Derived from arse, the British spelling of ass. Describes someone behaving negatively in an angry or agressive manner. 1. on t get arsey with me. 2. Isuggested doing xyz and she got all arsey about it …   Dictionary of american slang

  • arsey — Derived from arse, the British spelling of ass. Describes someone behaving negatively in an angry or agressive manner. 1. on t get arsey with me. 2. Isuggested doing xyz and she got all arsey about it …   Dictionary of american slang

  • arsey — adjective unpleasant, especially in a sarcastic, grumpy or haughty manner. Work experience as an arsey teenager is pretty straightforward: disappear into the storeroom, smoke a few cigarettes, text your mates and watch the minute hand tick slowly …   Wiktionary

  • Arsey — lucky …   Dictionary of Australian slang

  • arsey — Australian Slang lucky …   English dialects glossary

  • arsey — adj British truculent, aggressive, bumptious. A vogue term among young people since the late 1990s, also heard on US cam puses since 2000 …   Contemporary slang

  • arsey — adj. (English Slang) moody, depressed, grumpy, in a bad mood; affected by sharp mood swings …   English contemporary dictionary

  • arsey — adjective Brit. informal bad tempered or uncooperative …   English new terms dictionary

  • arsey — Adj. Moody …   English slang and colloquialisms

  • arsey — arsˈey or arsˈy adjective 1. Irritable, bad tempered, argumentative 2. Lucky (Aust) • • • Main Entry: ↑arse …   Useful english dictionary