Masser


Masser
Ⅰ.
Recorded as Masser, Massier, Maysor, Measor, Messer, and others, this is an English surname but one of early French origins. It was first introduced at the famous Conquest of 1066, or very shortly thereafter. It was also reintroduced by the Huguenot Protestant refugees in the period after 1580, when the religious persecution of protestants became the norm in France. The name is occupational, it derives from "Messier" and describes a hayward, one who was responsible for the gathering of the winter hay, and the protection against loss. The Coat of Arms from Lyon, is one of the most unusual recorded showing a tree proper on a gold field, with a saw fessways in the act of cutting down the tree. Presumably this is an allegorical reference to harvesting, whilst the gold field represents the wealth of the harvest and the golden corn. Included in the early recordings is the one of Erkbald le Messer of Lincoln in 1180, whilst William le Messier is found in the Nottingham Rolls of 1187. The later forms include Roger Maysor, son of George Maysor, christened at All Hallows Church, London Wall, on May 15th 1561, and Susenne Masure, who married Guillelmus Cognart at the French Huguenot Church, Threadneedle Street, on January 21st 1623. On February 25th 1730, Peter Masser married Magdalen Dupret at St Mary Le Bone, whilst on July 9th 1790, Sarah Measor married William Playstead at St Andrews Church, Soho, Westminster. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Roger Messer. This was dated 1172, in the Danelaw Rolls of Lincoln, during the reign of King Henry 11nd, 1154 - 1189. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.
Ⅱ.
This is a surname of early French origins, perhaps dating back to the conquest of 1066, or introduced shortly thereafter. It was also (see below) reintroduced by the Huguenot Protestant refugees in the period after 1580 when religious persecution became the norm in France. The name is occupational, it derives from "Messier" and describes a hayward, one who was responsible for the gathering of the winter hay, and the protection against loss. The Coat of Arms from Lyon, is one of the most unusual recorded showing a tree proper on a gold field, with a saw fessways in the act of cutting down the tree. Presumably this is an allegorical reference to harvesting, whilst the gold field represents the wealth of the harvest and the golden corn. In England the usual name spelling is Messer, although there are many variants. Included in the early recordings is Erkbald Le Messer of Lincoln in 1180, whilst William Le Messier is found in the Nottingham Rolls of 1187. The later forms include Roger Maysor, son of George Maysor, wife not recorded, christened at All Hallows Church, London Wall, on May 15th 1561, and Susenne Masure, who married Guillelmus Cognart at the French Huguenot Church, Threadneedle Street, on January 21st 1623. On February 25th 1730, Peter Maseres married Magdalen Dupret at St Mary Le Bone, whilst on July 9th 1790, Sarah Measor married William Playstead at St Andrews Church, Soho, Westminster. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Roger Messer, which was dated 1172, in the Danelaw Rolls of Lincoln, during the reign of King Henry 11, known as "The church builder," 1154 - 1189. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

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  • masser — 1. (ma sé) v. a. 1°   Disposer des objets en masse. Masser des terres. 2°   Terme de beaux arts. Disposer les masses d un tableau. Il a bien massé les figures, les ombres, les lumières.    Absolument. Ce peintre masse bien. 3°   Terme militaire.… …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • Masser — ist der Name folgender Personen: David Masser (* 1948), britischer Mathematiker Michael Masser (* 1941), US amerikanischer Popkomponist Siehe auch: Maser (Begriffsklärung) Diese Seite ist eine Begri …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Masser — Mass er, n. A priest who celebrates Mass. [R.] Bale. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • masser — Masser. v. a. Faire une masse. Il a massé dix pistoles. il n a masse que son reste. On dit, Masse tant, masse à qui dit, pour dire, Je masse tant, je masse à qui respondra. On dit fig. en beuvant, Masse à vous, pour dire, Je vous porte la santé d …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • masser — 1. masser [ mase ] v. tr. <conjug. : 1> • XIIIe, rare av. XIXe; de 1. masse ♦ Rassembler, réunir. Masser des hommes, des prisonniers sur une place. Masser des troupes, les disposer en ordre serré. Troupes massées à la frontière. Pronom. La… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • MASSER — v. tr. T. d’Art militaire Disposer en masses, en colonnes serrées. Masser l’infanterie. Le régiment se massa derrière une colline. SE MASSER signifie, dans le langage courant, Se porter en masse, se grouper. La foule s’est massée à cet endroit,… …   Dictionnaire de l'Academie Francaise, 8eme edition (1935)

  • Masser — Maaser Sheni, a Mitzvah instructing the Second Tithe be brought to Jerusalem. Masser is a surname, and may refer to: David Masser (born 1948), British Swiss mathematician Michael Masser (born 1941), American composer This page or section lists… …   Wikipedia

  • MASSER — v. a. (L A est bref.) Pétrir avec les mains les différentes parties du corps d une personne qui sort du bain, de manière à rendre les articulations plus souples et la circulation des humeurs plus facile. L usage de se faire masser est très commun …   Dictionnaire de l'Academie Francaise, 7eme edition (1835)

  • masser — vt. , faire des massages : massâ (Albanais.001, Morzine.081, Villards Thônes) ; pounyatâ (081) ; tripotâ fa. péj. (001). A1) masser les trayons pour faire venir le lait => Préparer. vt. , rassembler : massâ (Albanais) …   Dictionnaire Français-Savoyard

  • MASSER — v. a. (L A est bref.) T. de Peint. Disposer les masses d un tableau. Il a bien massé les figures, les ombres, les lumières de son tableau. Il n a pas bien massé le feuillage de cet arbre.   Il s emploie aussi absolument. Ce peintre masse bien,… …   Dictionnaire de l'Academie Francaise, 7eme edition (1835)