Satchel


Satchel
This unusual and interesting name is of Norman French origin, and is a metonymic occupational surname for a maker of small bags, satchels. The name was introduced into England after the Norman Conquest of 1066 in the Old French form "sachel", a little bag, or sack, along with the similar term "sachier", maker of sacks, which has produced the modern surname "sacher". In England the native equivalent of the surname is derived from the Olde English pre 7th Century "sacc", sack or bag, which produced the modern surnames Sack, Sacker, Secker, and the diminutive form Sackett. The modern surname from the French "sachel" can be found as Satchel and Satchell. One John Sachell married Anne Hapenny in London, in September 1632, and the christening of Mary, daughter of Thomas and Mary Satchel, was recorded at St. Giles Cripplegate, London, on May 2nd 1726. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Nicholas Sachel, which was dated 1243, witness in the "Assize Court Rolls of Somerset", during the reign of King Henry 111, known as "The Frenchman", 1216 - 1272. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

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  • Satchel — may refer to the following:* Satchel (bag), a carrying bag such as for school books ** Satchel charge, an explosive device typically carried in such a container ** Loculus (satchel), a Roman Legionary s satchel * Satchel Paige, a baseball pitcher …   Wikipedia

  • Satchel — Satch el . [OF. sachel, fr. L. saccellus, dim. of saccus. See {Sack} a bag.] A little sack or bag for carrying papers, books, or small articles of wearing apparel; a hand bag. [Spelled also {sachel}.] [1913 Webster] The whining schoolboy with his …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • satchel — small bag, mid 14c., from O.Fr. sachel, from L.L. saccellum money bag, purse, dim. of L. sacculus, dim. of saccus bag (see SACK (Cf. sack) (n.1)) …   Etymology dictionary

  • satchel — A canvas bag, with a large flap and shoulder strap, used by a city carrier to hold mail for delivery on a route. It is not used on a completely motorized route or mounted route …   Glossary of postal terms

  • satchel — [n] small bag attaché, backpack, briefcase, carryall, carry on, duffel bag, garment bag, handbag, haversack, knapsack, overnight bag, pack, pouch, rucksack, saddlebag, suitcase, tote, travel bag; concepts 339,450,494 …   New thesaurus

  • satchel — ► NOUN ▪ a shoulder bag with a long strap, used especially for school books. ORIGIN Old French sachel, from Latin saccellus small bag …   English terms dictionary

  • satchel — [sach′əl] n. [ME sachel < OFr < L saccellus, dim. of saccus, a bag, SACK1] a small bag for carrying clothes, books, etc., sometimes having a shoulder strap …   English World dictionary

  • satchel — [14] A satchel is etymologically a ‘small sack’ or bag. The word comes via Old French sachel from Latin saccellus, a diminutive form of saccus ‘bag’ (source of English sack). Its specific application to a ‘bag for carrying school books’ emerged… …   The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • satchel — UK [ˈsætʃ(ə)l] / US [ˈsætʃəl] noun [countable] Word forms satchel : singular satchel plural satchels a small strong bag for carrying school books that is made of thick cloth or leather and has a long handle that goes over your shoulder …   English dictionary

  • satchel — [14] A satchel is etymologically a ‘small sack’ or bag. The word comes via Old French sachel from Latin saccellus, a diminutive form of saccus ‘bag’ (source of English sack). Its specific application to a ‘bag for carrying school books’ emerged… …   Word origins