Bum


Bum
This uncommon and interesting name recorded in the spellings of Boam, Baum, Bamb, Bim, Bims, Bomb, Boom, and Bum, is generally of 13th century English origin. As such it is a metonymic occupational surname for a seller of spices or perfumes and ointments. The name derives from the word "balme", an aromatic substance prized for its medicinal qualities. Balme derives from the Latin "balsamun", the use of such medicines being possibly a Roman introduction to England. The surname Balmer may derive from the same source, this being occupational for one employed as an embalmer. Job-descriptive surnames originally denoted the actual occupation of the namebearer, and gradually became hereditary. The development of the name has included the following variant forms: Baume in Yorkshire in 1543, Bomb in 1562 Somerset, Bome in Devonshire in 1569, Balme in Derbyshire in 1574, Boame in Nottinghamshire in 1584, and Boome in London in 1605. The spelling as Boom may have a Huguenot ancestry and be a devlopment of the German-Flanders 'Bohm', meaning a former inhabitant of Bohemia. This spelling is found in London in 1799. Among the recordings of the name are the marriage of William Boam and Margaret Batkyne, at Stowe in Staffordshire, on May 22nd 1611, and the marriage of Jeames Boomes to Elizabeth Webb at St Boltolph without Aldgate, London, on July 17th 1589. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Johanne Bawne, which was dated November 20th 1538, christened at St. Stephan's, Coleman Street, London, during the reign of King Henry V111, known as "Bluff King Hal", 1509 - 1547. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

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  • bum — ☆ bum1 [bum ] n. [< bummer, prob. < Ger bummler, loafer, habitually tardy person < bummeln, to go slowly, waste time] Informal 1. a vagrant, hobo, tramp, or beggar; specif., a shabby, often drunken derelict 2. any shiftless or… …   English World dictionary

  • bum — Ⅰ. bum [1] ► NOUN Brit. informal ▪ a person s bottom. ORIGIN of unknown origin. Ⅱ. bum [2] informal ► NOUN N. Amer. 1) a vagrant. 2) …   English terms dictionary

  • Bum — or Bums may refer to:* a slang term for the buttocks * a slang term for a hobo (though unlike hobos, a bum is unlikely to seek work) * A lazy person; slacker * a slang term for Anal sex * B.U.M. Equipment, a Los Angeles clothing company * Babol… …   Wikipedia

  • Bum — Cette page d’homonymie répertorie les différents sujets et articles partageant un même nom. {{{image}}}   Sigles d une seule lettre   Sigles de deux lettres > Sigles de trois lettres …   Wikipédia en Français

  • bum! — bụm! 〈Int.〉 (Ausruf zur Nachahmung von dröhnendem Aufschlagen) ● bum!, bum!!; bim, bam, bum!! …   Universal-Lexikon

  • bum — bum̃ išt. Bum̃ bum̃ bum̃ mùša bū̃gną …   Bendrinės lietuvių kalbos žodyno antraštynas

  • bum — I {{/stl 13}}{{stl 8}}rz. mnż I, D. u, Mc. bummie, {{/stl 8}}{{stl 7}}to samo co boom. {{/stl 7}}{{stl 20}} {{/stl 20}} {{stl 20}} {{/stl 20}}bum II {{/stl 13}}{{stl 8}}wykrz. {{/stl 8}}{{stl 7}} głośny odgłos o ciemnej barwie powstający przy… …   Langenscheidt Polski wyjaśnień

  • bum — um (b[u^]m), v. t. To borrow without intention of returning; to cadge; as, to bum a cigarette; to bum a cup of coffee; usually with inexpensive items as the object. [informal] [PJC] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • bum — |bum Mot Agut Nom masculí …   Diccionari Català-Català

  • bum — interj. Cuvânt care imită zgomotul produs de o detunătură de armă, de o lovitură înfundată sau de o cădere. – Onomatopee. Trimis de valeriu, 21.03.2003. Sursa: DEX 98  bum interj. Trimis de siveco, 10.08.2004. Sursa: Dicţionar ortografic  BUM… …   Dicționar Român

  • bum — 1. Interjección onomatopéyica utilizada para imitar el ruido de un golpe o de una explosión: «Una chispa o una palabra soez, y ¡bum!, todos al infierno» (Marsé Embrujo [Esp. 1993]). 2. Adaptación gráfica de la voz inglesa boom (‘estruendo,… …   Diccionario panhispánico de dudas