Winsome


Winsome
There are several explanations and hence origins, for this English surname. Apparently recorded in a number of overlapping spelling forms including Winchcomb, Winchcombe, Winscombe, Winscomb, Wincom, Winsom, and Winsome, the name is almost always locational. As such the origination is either the ancient village of Winchcombe, meaning "remote valley", in the county of Gloucester, a place which is recorded Wincelcumba, in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicles of the year 816, or from Winscomb, a parish of the same meaning, in Axbridge, Somerset. Locational surnames are usually "from" names. That is to say names given to peiople after they left their original homesteads and moved elsewhere. Spelling being at best erratic and local dialects very thick, lead to the development of "sounds like" recordings. Another explanation for at least some of this surname spellings, is from the Olde English pre 7th century word "winsom" meaning attractive or lovely, and used as an early baptismal name. This is probably the explanation for the earliest surname recording of Matildla Winsom, in the Hundred Rolls of the county of Huntingdon in 1273, with William Winscombe being recorded in Somerset in 1316. Other examples include: John Winchcombe who married Elizabeth Dorsone at St Botolphs Bishopgate, in the city of London, on April 5th 1608, and Henrie Winchcomb who married Elizabeth Miller, at St Martins in the Field, Westminster, on November 20th 1639.

Surnames reference. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Winsome — Win some, a. [Compar. {Winsomer}; superl. {Winsomest}.] [AS. wynsum, fr. wynn joy; akin to OS. wunnia, OHG. wunna, wunni, G. wonne, Goth. wunan to rejoice (in unwunands sad), AS. wunian to dwell. ????. See {Win}, v. t., {Wont}, a.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Winsome — is a given name, and may refer to:* Winsome Evans (born 1941), Associate Professor of music at the University of Sydney * Winsome Sears (21st century), member of the Virginia House of Delegates …   Wikipedia

  • winsome — index sapid Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • winsome — (adj.) O.E. wynsum agreeable, pleasant, from wynn pleasure, delight (Cf. Ger. Wonne joy, delight; see WIN (Cf. win)) + sum some. Apparently surviving only in northern English dialect for 400 years until revived 18c. by Hamilton, Burns, and other… …   Etymology dictionary

  • winsome — *sweet, engaging, winning, dulcet Analogous words: see those at WINNING …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • winsome — ► ADJECTIVE ▪ attractive or appealing. DERIVATIVES winsomely adverb winsomeness noun. ORIGIN from an Old English word meaning «joy» …   English terms dictionary

  • winsome — [win′səm] adj. [ME winsum < OE wynsum, pleasant, delightful < wynn, delight, joy (for IE base see WIN) + sum, SOME1] attractive in a sweet, engaging way; charming winsomely adv. winsomeness n …   English World dictionary

  • winsome — [[t]wɪ̱nsəm[/t]] ADJ GRADED If you describe a person or their actions or behaviour as winsome, you mean that they are attractive and charming. ...a winsome young screen star... She gave him her best winsome smile. Syn: charming …   English dictionary

  • winsome — winning / winsome [adj1] attractive, charming acceptable, adorable, agreeable, alluring, amiable, bewitching, captivating, cute, delectable, delightful, disarming, enchanting, endearing, engaging, fascinating, fetching, gratifying, lovable,… …   New thesaurus

  • winsome — adjective Etymology: Middle English winsum, from Old English wynsum, from wynn joy; akin to Old High German wunna joy, Latin venus desire more at win Date: before 12th century 1. generally pleasing and engaging often because of a childlike charm… …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • winsome — winsomely, adv. winsomeness, n. /win seuhm/, adj. sweetly or innocently charming; winning; engaging: a winsome smile. [bef. 900; ME winsom, OE wynsum, equiv. to wyn joy (see WYNN) + sum SOME1] * * * …   Universalium