Wyeth


Wyeth
Wyeth is a variant of the English topographical name, 'Wythe', which traces its roots to the Olde English pre 7th Century 'wythe'. This term is a byform of 'withig' and referred to someone who lived by a Willow tree. Among the variants of this name are found 'with', 'wyth', and 'withe'. The original spelling is first entered for Thomas Wythe in 1581 (see below). One Francis With was christened on May 15th, 1584 at Harrow-on-the-Hill, London. Elizabeth and George Wyeth were married on the June 13th, 1700 at the Temple Church of England, London and George Wyeth was christened at St. Sepulchre's, London on February 18th 1704. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Thomas Wyth (married), which was dated May 14th 1581, St. James, Clerkenwell, during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I, Good Queen Bess, 1558 - 1603. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.