Biggin


Biggin
This interesting and unusual name with variant spellings, Biggins, Biggen and Biggans, is a locational name from any of the various places in England, including Biggin in Huntingdonshire. The name derives from the Northern Middle English 'bigging' building, or dwelling-place, a derivative of 'big' to build, identical to the Old Norse 'byggia'. The name came to denote an outbuilding and it is still used in Northumberland and Cumberland. The surname was first recorded in the late 14th Century (see below). One William atte Byggyngge appears in the Placenames of Cambridgeshire, 1397. John Biggin was christened on December 11th 1679 in St. Margaret's, Westminster, London. William Biggin married Mary Mare on January 12th 1686, in St. James's, Dukes Place, London. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Thomas del Biggyng, which was dated 1391, Register of the Freemen of the City of York, during the reign of King Richard 11, 'Richard of Bordeaux', 1377-1399. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

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  • Biggin — Hill Biggin Hill est située dans l arrondissement de Bromley à Londres à 13 kilomètres de Bromley. Aérodrome de la RAF C est dans ce quartier que se trouve l aéroport de Biggin Hill (code AITA : BQH) qui occupe une partie des terrains… …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Biggin — could be*Biggin (Dovedale and Parwich Ward), Derbyshire, in the Peak District *Biggin by Hulland, Derbyshire, near Hulland *Biggin, North Yorkshire *Biggin, Warwickshire * The manor of Biggin in the parish of Chadwell St Mary in Essex * a… …   Wikipedia

  • Biggin — Big gin, n. [F. b[ e]guin, prob. from the cap worn by the B[ e]guines. Cf. {Beguine}, {Biggon}.] A child s cap; a hood, or something worn on the head. [1913 Webster] An old woman s biggin for a nightcap. Massinger. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Biggin — Big gin, n. A coffeepot with a strainer or perforated metallic vessel for holding the ground coffee, through which boiling water is poured; so called from Mr. Biggin, the inventor. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Biggin — Big gin, Bigging Big ging, n. [OE. bigging. See {Big}, {Bigg}, v. t.] A building. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • biggin — [big′in] n. [MFr < OFr, orig. cap worn by the Beguines, a lay sisterhood] Archaic 1. a cap or hood, esp. for a child 2. a nightcap …   English World dictionary

  • biggin — biggin1 /big in/, n. Archaic. 1. a close fitting cap worn esp. by children in the 16th and 17th centuries. 2. a soft cap worn while sleeping; nightcap. [1520 30; < MF beguin kind of hood or cap, orig. one worn by a BEGUINE] biggin2 /big in/, n. a …   Universalium

  • biggin — noun /ˈbɪɡɪn/ a) A childs cap; (figuratively) childhood. , 1819: “my brain has been topsy turvy, they say, ever since the biggin was bound first round my head; so turning me upside down may peradventure restore it again.” Walter Scott, Ivanhoe b) …   Wiktionary

  • biggin — I. noun or bigging Etymology: Middle English bigging, from biggen to dwell, from Old Norse byggja; akin to Old English bēon to be Date: 14th century archaic building II. noun Etymology: Middle French beguin …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • biggin' — Cleveland Dialect List a building …   English dialects glossary