Blower


Blower
This unusual surname is a patronymic of Blower, which is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is from an occupational name for someone who operated a bellows, either as a blacksmith's assistant or to provide wind for a church organ, or for someone who blew a horn, such as a huntsman or a player of the musical instrument. The name is derived from the Middle English (1200-1500) "blowere", from the Olde English pre 7th Century "blawere", a derivative of "blawan", to blow. The surname development since 1199 (see below) includes: Lucia Blowere, a witness in the Assize Rolls of Kent, and Reginald le Blawere in the 1327 Subsidy Rolls of Essex. The modern surname can be found as Blower, Blow and Bloor(e), while the patronymic Blowers is mainly found in East Anglia. Recorded in the London Church Registers are the christening of Edward, son of James and Martha Blowers, on September 1st 1661 at St. Dunstan's, Stepney, and the marriage of Obadiah Blowers and Ann Lavson on May 12th 1667 at St. James', Duke's Place. A Coat of Arms granted to the family is a gold shield, an eagle displayed, red, with two heads. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of William le Blowerre, which was dated 1199, in the "Pipe Rolls of Surrey", during the reign of King Richard 1, known as "The Lionheart", 1189-1199. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England this was known as Poll Tax. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.

Surnames reference. 2013.

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  • Blower — may refer to:* Blower (fish), a fish of the Atlantic coast of the United States and the West Indies * USS Blower (SS 325), a submarine of the United States Navy * a ducted mechanical fan, especially when used in a heating, ventilating, and air… …   Wikipedia

  • Blower — Blow er, n. 1. One who, or that which, blows. [1913 Webster] 2. (Mech.) A device for producing a current of air; as: (a) A metal plate temporarily placed before the upper part of a grate or open fire. (b) A machine for producing an artificial… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • blower — early 12c. (originally of horn blowers), from O.E. blawere, agent noun from BLOW (Cf. blow) (v.1). Of mechanical devices from 1795 …   Etymology dictionary

  • blower — ► NOUN 1) a device for creating a current of air to dry or heat something. 2) informal, chiefly Brit. a telephone …   English terms dictionary

  • blower — [blō′ər] n. 1. a person who blows 2. any device for producing a current of air or for blowing air into a room, from a furnace, etc. 3. [Brit. Slang] the telephone …   English World dictionary

  • blower — 1. n. a cocaine user. (Drugs.) □ I can spot a blower any day. □ Max is a blower, among other things. 2. n. cocaine. (Drugs.) □ What’s the best quality blower around here? □ …   Dictionary of American slang and colloquial expressions

  • blower — noun (C) 1 a machine that blows out air: a snow blower for clearing the path 2 on the blower BrE old fashioned on the telephone in order to talk to someone: Get on the blower to him at once. see also: glassblower …   Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • blower — UK [ˈbləʊə(r)] / US [ˈbloʊər] noun [countable] Word forms blower : singular blower plural blowers a machine that produces a strong current of air • on the blower …   English dictionary

  • blower — [[t]blo͟ʊə(r)[/t]] N SING: the N The blower is the telephone. [BRIT, INFORMAL, OLD FASHIONED] Anyway, I soon got on the blower to him …   English dictionary

  • blower — Puffer Puff er, n. 1. One who puffs; one who praises with noisy or extravagant commendation. [1913 Webster] 2. One who is employed by the owner or seller of goods sold at suction to bid up the price; a by bidder. Bouvier. [1913 Webster] 3. (Zo[… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English